Alert

Published on September 29, 2019

Healthy Habits, Regular Screening Key to Reducing Breast Cancer Risk

The American Cancer Society estimates more than 250,000 new cases of invasive Breast Cancer will be diagnosed in women this year.

The good news is that a healthy lifestyle and consistent screening schedule can help many patients reduce their risk factors for developing cancer and, through early detection, improve chances for successful treatment.

Who is at Risk?

Breast Cancer can develop any time, but risk increases as we age, said Dr. Brittany Taylor Grady a Primary Care Provider at UNC Primary Care at Goldsboro.

“We typically see the incidences increase above the age of 40,” said Dr. Taylor. “And, if you have first degree relatives with Breast Cancer, this can also put you at risk.”

Maintaining a Healthy Lifestyle

From eating a well-balanced diet to exercising regularly and not smoking, there are a number of things patients can do proactively to improve their overall health and well-being.

Dr. Taylor recommends patients eat plenty of vegetables, fruit and fiber, exercise a minimum of 30 minutes per day, four days per week and avoid smoking.

Regular Screening with 3-D Mammography

Dr. Taylor said 40 is the age when patients should begin discussing routine screening with their provider. She recommends annual mammograms for patients between the ages of 45-55.

Wayne UNC Health Care offers patients the most advanced screening and diagnostic capabilities available, with 3-D Mammography that uses multiple X-rays to recreate a three-dimensional image of the breast.

Open Dialogue

One of the most important elements of a patient’s cancer prevention efforts, said Dr. Taylor, is regular and open dialogue with their physician.

A family physician can be an invaluable resource for patients wanting to remain healthy and on track with a personalized and effective plan for prevention and screening.

Schedule a Screening Mammogram

Fill out our Schedule a Mammogram form to request an appointment at Wayne UNC Health Care. You don’t need a referral for a screening mammogram, but you’ll need to tell us the name of your primary care provider. (Find a Primary Care Provider.)

If you’re experiencing breast pain or feel a lump, see your primary care provider to determine if you need a referral for a diagnostic mammogram.

Schedule a Mammogram

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